Sudan United Association receives funding for first event

[Iowa State Daily] Sudan United Association receives funding for first event

The Senate voted to fund menstruation product dispensers for the Memorial Union. Of the 16 gender-neutral bathrooms in the hub for student life, 11 do not have menstrual product dispensers.

The Senate unanimously funded three dispensers Wednesday and has intentions to later fund three additional dispensers through the organization’s green initiatives fund. The products in the dispensers will be free.

One of the Directors of Health and Wellness, Charlotte Everist, a senior in animal science, said the health and wellness committee’s goal is to make menstruation products accessible to every person.

“This is going to be an amazing resource for anyone on campus who menstruates, regardless of their gender identity,” Everist said.

The three dispensers were funded for $2,751.87.

The Sudan United Association requested and received $3,060 for an upcoming event. The event will include interactive activities, performances, visual art and cultural displays on Nov. 12 at the Ames City Hall.

“It would be the first event, pretty much, representing Sudanese culture on campus,” said Saja Ibrahim, vice president of the association.

A food line item is $2,000, while $750 is for equipment and venue rental. The remaining $310 is for printing and posters.

The SCUBA Diving and Snorkeling Club requested $2,100 to fund half of the cost for seven members to become scuba certified.

Senators compared the bill to requirements outlined in priorities and criteria, a document that dictates what is eligible to receive funding from the Senate discretionary account. Multiple senators pointed out that Student Government’s funding priorities and criteria do not fund instructors for organizations.

With a vote of 5-21-0, the bill did not pass.

“I’m all in favor of scuba diving and scuba club, and I really hope that you guys can get funding for this stuff, but I think there are other resources that we can hopefully get you guys in contact with,” said Vice Speaker Andrew Brueck, a senior in political science. “But, as it stands, I just don’t think it fits with how we’ve set up our finance system.”

Paige Higby, a junior in animal ecology and president of the organization, said the club aims to let any Iowa State student interested in learning about scuba or snorkeling to do so in a safe and fun environment. The club was at a standstill for the past two years due to the pandemic and has seen an increase in membership this year.

Higby said she is hoping to pursue water conservation projects with the organization, such as cleaning trash out of waterways.

Cardinal Eats, a food publication, requested $3,000 to assist with printing costs associated with the organization’s magazine.

The organization distributes the publication free of charge around campus.

Due to the organization’s size and the cost to print a magazine, its members cannot raise enough money to pay to print the magazine.

The bill passed unanimously.

Senate approved apportionments for constituencies for the upcoming academic year. The apportionments designate the number of senators representing each constituency. The bill passed unanimously, and there were no changes from last year’s numbers.

The Student Government diversity, equity and inclusion committee received a budget specific to the committee, something that only two other committees have, those being public relations and student initiatives.

The budget does not change how much money the committee has access to. With the passing of the bill, the committee can now spend money without having to gain approval from the Senate. The budget speeds up the process of paying for things.

Ethan Matthews, a freshman in performing arts and off-campus Senator, was confirmed as a member to the public relations committee. Matthews joined the Senate three weeks ago.

Next week, the Senate will see funding bills for the following:

Information technology services Student Legal Services Winterfest ISU Golf Club

The body will also see bills regarding internal bylaw changes.